Early Recovery Advisor

  • Added Date: Wednesday, 11 January 2017
  • Deadline Date: Tuesday, 17 January 2017

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Six years into the conflict, the humanitarian situation in Syria continues to deteriorate. Over half of the country’s population has fled their homes: 4.8 million people have sought refuge in the region and beyond, and 6.3 million people are internally displaced. 13.5 million people are in need of some form of assistance. Poverty rate is estimated at 85.2%, while the unemployment rate exceeds 52%.  In 2017, with no end to the conflict in sight, humanitarian needs are expected to continue to grow in scale, severity, and complex.  Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) 2017 preparation process was led by OCHA with a significant contribution from the Early Recovery Sector led by UNDP, which has been bridging Humanitarian assistance and Development by strengthening Resilience of the affected population in Syria.  The role of Early Recovery Sector is expected to grow faster in the given situation on the ground to accelerate the transition from immediate Humanitarian assistance to IDPs and affected population to more sustainable and development-oriented support. 

The major socio-economic challenges facing those in need remain the lack of jobs and income generating activities, followed by shortages in electricity and water supply for domestic, agricultural and industrial/productive use, deteriorating sewage and garbage collection services and the lack of basic and social infrastructure and services. An overarching challenge is the impact of the crisis on the social fabric of communities, especially in areas hosting large numbers of IDPs and/or witnessing high levels of destruction to community infrastructure. The destruction of economic, social and human infrastructure has deprived Syrians across the country of the foundation required to meet their basic needs.  While it is evident that local economies require a safe and stable environment conducive to providing livelihood opportunities and enabling improved living conditions, the deterioration of basic services continues to undermine the viability of productive sectors faced with a multitude of related challenges, and feeding a vicious cycle of unemployment, diminishing resources and increased levels of poverty.

The priorities of UNDP Syria are, as stipulated in the Country Programme Document 2016-2017, to enhance the resilience and socio-economic stabilization of individuals and communities through restoring the disrupted livelihoods of the affected communities; and restoring, rehabilitating and maintaining sustainable basic services and infrastructure in damaged areas and host communities. Embedded in each priority is an institutional crisis response capacity development component for key national and local partners. Mindful of the scale of the crisis, the scaled-up, targeted, and rapidly responsive interventions of UNDP Syria would strive to mitigate displacement and movement of refugees, including forced, illegal, and unsafe migration and the trafficking of refugees. Crucial to this objective is the decision to focus on stabilizing communities that host large numbers of displaced persons; the rapid support through peace dividends in areas of relative calm and where internally displaced persons return; and the promotion of social cohesion.

In order to position the Syria CO for scaled up programming, for expansion in terms of geographic coverage – including possibly local-agreement (ceasefire) and hard-to-reach and cross-line/cross-border areas, and for expansion into thematically new areas (reconciliation, community security, and governance), the CO has increased its human resource capacity (i.e. enhanced presence in the field outside Damascus, a consultant to undertake a conflict analysis for new programmatic locations, and staff presence in Gaziantep, Turkey) Accordingly, UNDP Syria aims to show growth in delivery from $30-35million in 2016 to $60million target in 2017. 

As the scale of needs continues to grow, and following the adoption of resolutions 2139 and 2165 by the United Nations Security Council, humanitarian actors operating inside Syria from Damascus or across the Turkish and Jordanian borders met in Beirut on 3 September 2014 and decided to embark on a “Whole of Syria” (WOS) approach in an effort to improve the effectiveness and operational reach of their collective responses. The cornerstone of the WOS approach is a commitment by all humanitarian partners to a coordinated response through the IASC sector/cluster approach to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their response through (1) developing a principled, predictable and systematic operational planning process; (2) ensuring greater coherence across the different operational modalities (i.e. cross-line, cross-border or regular programmes) through improved coordination; and (3) strengthening information-sharing and monitoring of response. Since September 2014, humanitarian actors responding to the Syria crisis have been collectively working under the leadership of the Humanitarian Coordinator in Syria and the Deputy Regional Humanitarian Coordinator on joint planning, programming and reporting mechanisms to ensure a harmonized and coordinated response under the WoS approach.

In the country, Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) meet regularly under the leadership of HC with participation of UN Agency Heads, Sector Leads and key Humanitarian takeholders.

Preparation of the Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) for Syria is coordinated by OCHA on an annual basis.  After compilation of evidence-based data, Sector Leads guide the sector to prepare the inputs for HRP.  The HRP is owned by the UN in Syria and is issued after a consultation and endorsement by the Government. OCHA coordinates the implementation by Sectors, conducts monitoring of progress and indicates gaps in implementation. 

In Syria, Strategic Framework (SF) was signed by the Government, UNRC and UN Agencies in February 2016 for 2 years to define areas of collaboration, in lieu of UNDAF. 

Under the overall direction of the Country Director and the daily supervision of the Deputy Country Director, the incumbent will support UNDP to ensure that recovery is geared to the best interest of affected and vulnerable populations, focusing on the achievement of the following results:

  • Leading the UNDP Syria’s Strategic Advisory Team to develop and implement early recovery and resilience policy, strategy and programming for the CO, including partnership development inside the country and with donors;
  • Technically advise, guide and support the formulation and implementation of UNDP early recovery, livelihoods and resilience programming, and support the building of required capacity of the CO in this area;
  • Provide advisory support to the UN RC/HC and the HCT on early recovery policy and programming, and mainstreaming ERL;
  • Lead the coordination of the Inter-Agency Early Recovery and Livelihoods Sector within the frameworks of Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), Whole of Syria (WoS).

Leading the UNDP Syria’s Strategic Advisory Team to develop and implement early recovery and resilience policy, strategy and programming for the CO, including partnership development inside the country and with donors:

  • Lead development and implementation of policy, strategy and programming on early recovery and resilience-based planning;
  • Establish and implement planning, monitoring and reporting mechanisms for evidence-based Early Recovery programming of the CO;
  • Design and implementation of project interventions with focus on, among others: emergency employment for debris management/rubble removal and rehabilitation of community infrastructure implemented through cash or food for work; targeted livelihoods and enterprise recovery aimed at restoring micro and small enterprises and self-employment through cash grants, start-up kits, vouchers or in-kind aid; and Social capital recovery through developing networks, social fabric, associations, key institutions;
  • Ensure funds mobilization in fostering partnership with UN agencies in the country as well as potential donors by sharing Early Recovery strategy and results of the Syria CO;
  • Take the lead on developing strategic planning and programmatic support to national systems in developing capacities for livelihood interventions, particularly in the priority areas/sectors identified through needs assessments (NGOs, local authorities).

 

Technically advise, guide and support the formulation and implementation of UNDP early recovery, livelihoods and resilience programming, and support the building of required capacity of the CO in this area:

  • Technically lead, guide and support the design, formulation and implementation of project interventions through capacity building of the Programme Team Leaders with focus on, among others: emergency employment for debris management/rubble removal and rehabilitation of community infrastructure implemented through cash or food for work; targeted livelihoods and enterprise recovery aimed at restoring micro and small enterprises and self-employment through cash grants, start-up kits, vouchers or in-kind aid; and Social capital recovery through developing networks, social fabric, associations, key institutions;
  • Ensure evidence-based implementation of the livelihoods strategy;
  • Identify capacity gaps and rooms for improvement in the implementation of the Early Recovery programmes and projects, suggest and introduce rectifying measures to ensure attainment of results, in consultation with Senior Management of the CO.

 

Provide advisory support to the UN RC/HC and the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) on early recovery policy and programming, and mainstreaming ERL:

  • As the Lead of the Early Recovery and Livelihood Sector, provide technical advice to UN RC/HC as well as to HCT on early recovery policy and programming;
  • Mainstream Early Recovery in the HCT, aiming at smooth transition from humanitarian and development programming.

 

Lead the coordination of the Inter-Agency Early Recovery and Livelihoods Sector within the frameworks of Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), Strategic Framework (SF) and Whole of Syria (WoS):

  • As the Lead of the Early Recovery and Livelihood Sector, establish strategic relations with all stakeholders to ensure that livelihoods concerns are known and addressed within the overall livelihoods strategy and response within the frameworks of the Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), Strategic Framework (SF) and its successor framework, Whole of Syria (WoS), and any Appeals and interventions by coordinating and preparing inputs;
  • Ensure inter-agency coordination on early recovery and livelihoods, through interaction with UN Agencies, government and non-governmental partners and CSOs;
  • Interact with the global Cluster Working Group on Early Recovery (CWGER) in Geneva as needed;
  • Lead and facilitate the establishment of mechanisms to ensure consensus on the recovery process at Sector-level and the transparent use of resources, through appropriate consultative processes involving the participation of all stakeholders;
  • Coordinate with other Sectors especially regarding the early recovery activities being undertaken;
  • Facilitate the generation and dissemination of livelihood interventions and knowledge products.

 

Impact of Results:

The key results will have an impact on UNDP strategic positioning and early recovery programming, and the success of the Early recovery and livelihood Sector Working Group. The Working Group serves as a platform for policy and programmatic advice to the UNCT and to the HCT, on issues related to early recovery and livelihoods, and facilitates information sharing among concerned Agencies, NGOs, and institutions.

Corporate Competencies:

  • Demonstrates integrity by modelling the UN’s values and ethical standards;
  • Promotes the vision, mission and strategic goals of the UN;
  • Displays cultural, gender, religion, race, nationality and age sensitivity and adaptability;
  • Treats all people fairly without favoritism.

 

Functional (UN) Competencies:

 

Knowledge Management and Learning:

  • Promotes knowledge management among UN and non-UN partners;
  • In-depth practical knowledge of inter-disciplinary programmatic issues regarding the transition from relief to recovery;
  • Actively works towards continuing personal learning and development, acts on learning plan and applies newly acquired skills;
  • Seeks and applies knowledge, information, and best practices from within and outside of the UN.

 

Coordination Effectiveness:

  • Ability to lead and guide the design and implementation of UN joint programme activities, strengthening of strategic partnerships for Livelihood and Early Recovery;
  • Ability to build and sustain effective partnerships with UN Agencies and main constituents, advocate effectively, communicate sensitively across different constituencies.

 

Management and Leadership:

  • Focuses on impact and result for the client;
  • Leads and guide teams effectively and shows conflict resolution skills;
  • Establishes priorities for self and other members of the team; schedules activities to ensure optimum use of time and resources;
  • In providing advice to the Deputy Country Director, Country Director and the RC/HC, has the capacity to gather comprehensive information on complex problems or situations; evaluates information accurately and identifies key issues required to resolve problems;
  • Consistently approaches work with energy and a positive, constructive attitude Demonstrates excellent oral and written communication skills;
  • Builds strong relationships with clients and external actors;
  • Manages conflict and stress, remaining composed and working as a mediator in crisis or antagonistic situations;
  • Demonstrates openness to change and ability to manage complexities;
  • Responds positively to critical feedback and differing points of view;
  • Solicits feedback from staff about the impact of his/her own behavior;
  • Development and Operational Effectiveness;
  • Ability to lead strategic planning, change processes, management and reporting;
  • Ability to lead formulation, oversight of implementation, monitoring and evaluation of strategic plans/frameworks.

Education:

  • Advanced university degree in Social sciences, development studies, and other related fields.

 

Experience:

  • At least 10 years of experience in the development and emergency interventions fields, particularly in conflict and post-conflict areas;
  • International experience in Early Recovery programming and implementation in conflict situation is a must.

 

Language Requirements:

  • Fluency in English both written and oral;
  • Fluency in Arabic an asset.

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Contract Duration: 1 Year with possibility for extension

This vacancy is archived.

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